In-Store Decision Making

The GWC USA company needs to understand the in-store decision making that consumers make when they go shopping. Studies show that spontaneous shopping consists of unplanned buying, which is a reminder to buy something, and impulse buying, which is a sudden, irresistible urge to buy something. For spontaneous shopping, when it comes to unplanned buying vs. impulse buying, there is a wider aisle display with high profit margins that encourage consumers to browse, a portable shopper in grocery stores and planners vs. partial planners vs. impulse purchasers are important to keep in mind.

The point of purchase can be an elaborate product display or demonstration, a coupon-dispensing machine, or even someone giving out free samples. When it comes to the sales person at a retailer, there is an exchange theory happening which is every interaction that involves an exchange of value. At the checkout of any retail store, there needs to be expertise and likeability, a commercial friendship and an incidental similarity. A dyadic relationship between the buyer and the seller needs to occur and this involves having an identity negotiation, salespersons’ styles differ and there are interaction styles too. After a customer purchases an item, they will always go through the post purchase satisfaction stage or dissatisfaction, which is determined by attitude about a product after purchase. The markets constantly on lookout for sources of consumer dissatisfaction and Canadian banks actually were able to prove that better service commanded a larger share of wallet than others.

Consumers will also go through perceptions of product quality, and an expectancy disconfirmation model which means that the consumers form beliefs of product quality based on prior performance of the product. It is important for marketers to be able to manage expectations such as not promising what you can’t deliver, expectations determine the satisfaction and dissatisfaction of consumers and the under promising strategies often work well for retailers.

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